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Information Security Solutions

Information security, sometimes shortened to InfoSec, is the practice of protecting information by mitigating information risks. It is part of information risk management.It typically involves preventing or reducing the probability of unauthorized/inappropriate access to data, or the unlawful use, disclosure, disruption, deletion, corruption, modification, inspection, recording, or devaluation of information.

It also involves actions intended to reduce the adverse impacts of such incidents. Protected information may take any form, e.g. electronic or physical, tangible (e.g. paperwork) or intangible (e.g. knowledge).Information security's primary focus is the balanced protection of the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of data (also known as the CIA triad) while maintaining a focus on efficient policy implementation, all without hampering organization productivity.

This is largely achieved through a structured risk management process that involves:

identifying information and related assets, plus potential threats, vulnerabilities, and impacts;

evaluating the risks;

deciding how to address or treat the risks i.e. to avoid, mitigate, share or accept them;

where risk mitigation is required, selecting or designing appropriate security controls and implementing them;

monitoring the activities, making adjustments as necessary to address any issues, changes and improvement opportunities.

To standardize this discipline, academics and professionals collaborate to offer guidance, policies, and industry standards on password, antivirus software, firewall, encryption software, legal liability, security awareness and training, and so forth.This standardization may be further driven by a wide variety of laws and regulations that affect how data is accessed, processed, stored, transferred and destroyed.However, the implementation of any standards and guidance within an entity may have limited effect if a culture of continual improvement isn't adopted.

At the core of information security is information assurance, the act of maintaining the confidentiality, integrity, and availability (CIA) of information, ensuring that information is not compromised in any way when critical issues arise.These issues include but are not limited to natural disasters, computer/server malfunction, and physical theft. While paper-based business operations are still prevalent, requiring their own set of information security practices, enterprise digital initiatives are increasingly being emphasized,with information assurance now typically being dealt with by information technology (IT) security specialists. 

These specialists apply information security to technology (most often some form of computer system). It is worthwhile to note that a computer does not necessarily mean a home desktop.A computer is any device with a processor and some memory. Such devices can range from non-networked standalone devices as simple as calculators, to networked mobile computing devices such as smartphones and tablet computers.

IT security specialists are almost always found in any major enterprise/establishment due to the nature and value of the data within larger businesses.They are responsible for keeping all of the technology within the company secure from malicious cyber attacks that often attempt to acquire critical private information or gain control of the internal systems.

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